A book review of freedom summer the savage season of 1964 that made mississippi burn and made americ

Violence broke out in Northern cities, proving that racist and bigotry were not exclusively Southern phenomena. Watson even tells the story of an insurance agent who defended the the work of Freedom Summer and, as a result, his business was ruined, his family harassed and they were eventually forced to move out of the state.

It was the summer when the country was really shocked to discover that white Mississippi would stoop to beatings and murder to "preserve their way of life", i. But the book also depicts the contributions of lesser-known names—courageous figures such as newspaper publisher and editorial writer Hazel Brannon Smith of the Lexington Advertiser, whose anti-lynching and pro-civil rights commentary made her the first woman to win a Pulitzer for editorial writing, and eager volunteers like Amherst student Chris Williams, who would have preferred to spend his summer surfing, but instead risked his life alerting black Mississippians about their rights to vote.

Freedom Summer focuses on the contributions of the college students who came from the North, the West and the Midwest over that key three-month period to assist in voter registration and education. The final chapters of the book focus on the impact of Freedom Summer, particularly on the heart-breaking defeat at the Democratic Convention.

But Watson also chronicles how Mississippi changed--and changed relatively quickly--after the Voting Rights Act of and after the awful publicity from Freedom Summer business and tourism were affected seriously.

And in the end, Mississippi refused to prosecute anyone and the only trial was when the Federal government brought suit for Civil Rights violations, which the defendants laughed at.

Dec 10, Susan rated it it was amazing I remember the summer of very well--I watched most of it on the TV evening news where I gathered with fellow Peace Corps trainees in the evenings at Indiana University and for two weeks at Indiana State in Terra Haute.

I was going to Africa to help blacks--and not going to Mississippi--because I wanted to see the world, other cultures, etc. BeforeI had never been particularly tuned in to Civil Rights.

Politics trumped conscience on that one. It was a period when citizens of good will put aside differences in color and background and came together on a quest for justice.

We had classes all day: Their deaths brought international attention to the state, finally got the FBI seriously involved in fighting the campaign of violence and terror that had been waged against both black and white civil rights workers for years, and steeled the resolve of such famous types as Rev.

Yet on the first night they arrived, three of their members—Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney—disappeared and were later found murdered. It took all summer for the FBI to find informants who eventually led them to the bodies. And if you wonder "why Mississippi? And it was the summer when 3 Civil Rights workers were murdered by a bunch of racists and KKK members who got a backhoe and buried them under a dam being built.

It was really like going to summer school except that we all lived together in Quonset huts left over from WWII and stuck together because we never had a fr I remember the summer of very well--I watched most of it on the TV evening news where I gathered with fellow Peace Corps trainees in the evenings at Indiana University and for two weeks at Indiana State in Terra Haute.

As well as profiling the leaders and providing an excellent overview of Mississippi history since the Civil War, it focuses on four of the volunteers--who they were, why they joined, what happened to them in Mississippi--even where they are now. Not all of the blowback from Freedom Summer was benign.

Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy

They were idealistic, committed to progressive ideals of social justice and freedom, and determined to make a difference. It was really like going to summer school except that we all lived together in Quonset huts left over from WWII and stuck together because we never had a free minute from 7 in the morning till 9 or 10 at night.

It was also the summer where the Freedom Democrats tried unsuccessfully to get seated at the Democratic convention to supplement or replace the illegally chosen white Democrats. Stokley Carmichael and others moved to "black power" and discouraged the participation of whites in Civil Rights issues.

Martin Luther King Jr. And while that murder was undoubtedly the worst thing that happened during Freedom Summer, it was certainly not the only violence. When at the airport in NY a man laughed at us and said, "IF you want to help blacks, I can just take you to Harlem and you can work there.

It will be an eye opener. And I felt twinges of guilt all summer. But the civil rights victory, and its impact on every other human rights movement of the late 20th century, did not come easily. Many citizens who had been afraid to speak out when the voices of hate ruled began to make themselves heard.

A mealy-mouth compromise was reached--and Humbert Humphrey cried too when he proposed it.

Freedom summer : the savage season of 1964 that made Mississippi burn and made America a democracy

SNCC became increasingly divided over the issue of nonviolence.Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson A riveting account of one of the most remarkable episodes in American history. In his critically acclaimed history Freedom Summer, award- winning author Bruce Watson presents powerful testimony about a crucial episode in /5(7).

Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy, or Freedom Summer, is a nonfiction history written in by the journalist Bruce Watson/5.

In my effort not be outdone, I chose to read Freedom Summer: The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson. The book is an account of the summer ofalso known as "Freedom Summer". Close to college students went into the belly of the beast of America's most segregated state: Mississippi.

Books like Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by. Jul 19,  · FREEDOM SUMMER The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy By Bruce Watson Illustrated.

pages. Viking. $ Get this from a library! Freedom summer: the savage season of that made Mississippi burn and made America a democracy.

[Bruce Watson] -- Using in-depth interviews with participants and residents, Watson brilliantly captures the tottering legacy of Jim Crow in Mississippi, while vividly portraying: the chaos that brought such .

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A book review of freedom summer the savage season of 1964 that made mississippi burn and made americ
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